Without consent there is no honourable case for remaining in the EU

March for Europe, July 2016 by mazz_5

A year ago I predicted that Britain was almost certain to trigger Article 50 and begin exiting the EU, after a narrow but clear victory for “leave” in the referendum.

So it has proved. In March prime minister Theresa May sent a letter to Brussels indicating that Britain will leave the bloc after 40 years’ membership. Legal commentary saw it as inevitable that once the article was invoked Britain would make for the exit, albeit with some resistance.

Now, who knows?

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Labour Is No Longer The Party Of Kinnock Or Kendall, But Corbyn And McDonnell

War Criminals, April 2007 by Fabio Venni

As the strife in Labour mounted following the EU referendum, its former leader Neil Kinnock told a meeting of the party’s MPs: “Dammit this is our party! I’ve been in it for 60 years! I’m not leaving it to anybody!”

The sentiment was repeated, albeit in milder form, by the former leadership hopeful Liz Kendall in an interview with GQ last week.

“I’m not going to leave my party,” she said. “I am not going to give up my party to people who do not represent what we believe.”

Who exactly the “we” or the “our” Kinnock and Kendall refer to is unclear in the above statements.

Indeed, the tussle over Britain’s major leftwing party has revealed a complex ownership that underpins any large organisation.

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The complaints of remainers after the EU referendum just do not make sense

St Pauls Cathedral, March 2016 by Descrier

As someone who spends much of his time listening to left-wingers, I’m used to seeing people upset after losing an election.

Contrary to popular cliché, such events rarely look like the five stages of grief, and the aftermath of the British decision to leave the European Union has been no different.

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Corporate elision sullies the end of the Indy, Fleet Street’s last great gamble

Independent final edition 2, March 2016 by Jimmy Nicholls

Should a real press regulator ever be set up in this country, its first rule should be that any paper found to be puffing itself like a political or corporate dispatch will be abolished on sight.

Most would not last the day, windbaggery being a practice most editors and proprietors enjoy even as the grunts on the newsdesk wipe tears from their eyes as they extract the sliver of meaningful information from another slew of press releases.

It’s this practice that leaves a bitter taste in the mouth as one leafs through the last paper edition of the Independent, still the last full-blooded national ever launched in Britain (New Day and the i being cheap-sheets) after 30 years.

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