Is the EU merely ‘a continuation of Germany’ by other, sneakier means?

The argument that the EU is a cunning scheme by which Germany can finally achieve its ambition of constructing an empire across the breadth of Europe has always struck me as rather cheeky.

On the surface it appears hysterical, and indeed many of its proponents would likely be attacked as such by the ungenerous (and leftwing) critic that came across this suggestion.

…but on the other hand, there is something to it – especially in a week when the German chancellor Angela Merkel has been declared Time’s Person of the Year.

Continue Reading

Even if we banned Trump the Internet has rendered ‘hate speech’ laws redundant

Donald Trump, July 2015 by DonkeyHotey

The furore over the latest musings of the professional loudmouth Donald Trump has provoked an ironic response from those residing just across the pond from the US.

Those who venture onto the British government’s official petition website will find that at least 340,000 have signed a petition to block the American presidential candidate from entering Britain, at least as of Wednesday night.

Continue Reading

‘Concerned Student 1950’ social justice warriors merrily trample on the free press

Concerned Student 1950 vs the media, screencap via Mark Schierbecker

Censorious students are moving from ironic to trite with remarkable speed these days, even given the famed naivety of undergraduates when it comes to political moorings.

In Britain the Spectator termed the latest generation of pupils the “Stepford Students” some months ago, with the author Brendan O’Neill’s main title Spiked also putting together an index on which universities were the most illiberal in terms of free speech.

Continue Reading

Tony Abbott has a surprisingly nuanced view on Islamic militancy

Guildhall, City of London, March 2015 by DncnH

Some of you may still remember Tony Abbott, the Australian prime minister who was turfed out by his old buddy Malcolm Turnbull in a brutal political coup back in September.

At the end of October, and presumably with a lighter schedule, Abbott spoke at the Second Annual Margaret Thatcher Lecture at the Guildhall in the City of London, the seat of the shady body that runs the capital’s financial borough.

Continue Reading