Podcast Ep. 32: Google’s Taxes, Iowa Primary, Cameron’s diversity pledge

RD E32 Google tax, Iowa caucus, Cameron diversity

Google’s tax deal, the American presidential primaries and a diversity pledge from David Cameron provide the table talk for this week as Jazza and Jimmy are joined by Nick Mazzei, an ex-army Conservative member and sometime Huffington Post blogger.

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Podcast Ep.31: Cameron teaches English, Labour’s election loss and the death of Litvinenko

RD E31, David Cameron English, Labour Election Defeat, Alexander Litvinenko murder

David Cameron’s English lessons, Labour’s disastrous general election and the death of Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko are the three subjects the Right Dishonourable delve into in this week’s podcast.

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Podcast Ep. 26: Bombing Syria (again), French elections and Sam Pepper’s phoney murder

Prime minister David Cameron’s contentious decision to bomb Syria dominates the podcast this week, as Jazza and Jimmy are joined by Myles Dyer, a cyber-philanthropist and YouTuber.

In the first segment Myles lays out his concerns about the vote in the Commons to bomb Syria as well as the West’s general involvement in the region, issues he also discusses in a video from his YouTube channel.

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Theresa May claims the Paris Attacks have ‘nothing to do with Islam’. She is wrong

Paris, September 2007 by Moyan Brenn

In the wake of the terrorists attacks on Paris last week it was obvious that at least some politicians would incite that cliché that, no matter how many shouts of “Allahu Akbar” were heard among the gunshots on Friday, this violence was in no way Islamic.

And so it has proved. Only on Tuesday Theresa May, the home secretary, duly stood up in the Commons and intoned: “The attacks have nothing to do with Islam.”

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George Osborne’s biography shows the shallow success of the Tory modernisers

George Osborne, Trade Mission, January 2014 by Lee Davy

In the wake of Labour’s humiliating summer it is tempting to think that the Tories have returned as the natural party of government, and are set to dominate politics for at least the next decade.

Few have profited from this perception more than the chancellor George Osborne, credited as one of the chief architects of the surprise Conservative general election victory, as well as the party’s success against New Labour more generally.

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