Podcast Ep. 73: Hammond, Sturgeon To Offer Light-Hearted Political Crises

RD E73 Spreadshit Phil

The Sturg’s decision to call a second round on Scottish independence, the impending invocation of Article 50 (already triggering some), fallout from Spreadsheet Phil’s budget, and an EU court case allowing religious clothing bans are the topics for this week on the podcast.

Joining us is freelance journalist James O’Malley, a self-confessed social democrat and writer at the New Statesman, the Independent and recently Gizmodo.

Image based on Nato Summit Wales 2014 by Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Podcast Ep. 58: Scottish Independence, Parliament vs Brexit & Louis Smith Mocking Islam

Oliver Cromwell on Brexit

This week we discuss Scottish independence, Parliament’s role in Britain leaving the EU, an “Islamophobia” controversy involving an Olympian, and identity politics – joined by Carl Benjamin, better known as the YouTuber Sargon of Akkad.

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Podcast Ep. 50: We Voted For Brexit, So What Now?

Brexit Tea by frankieleon

John is called in to mediate Jazza and Jimmy, both on different sides of the Brexit vote, and to discuss the fallout from last week’s vote.

Scotland, Ireland, and the future of the Lib Dems, Tories and Labour are all on the cards. Basically, we’re fucked. (Ed: According to Jazza.)

Image Credit – Brexit Tea by frankieleon

Scots sceptics on independence after SNP surge

Edinburgh Castle, Apr 2005, Stuart Caie

Much has been written about the possibility of the Scottish National Party pushing for another referendum on independence should they augment their recent surge in Westminster seats with a victory in the Scottish parliamentary elections next year.

This is despite reports that the Scots could lose out financially if they claimed fiscal autonomy for themselves because of tumbling oil prices. Perhaps for that reason many of them are sceptical that Scotland will become independent before the next general election (currently scheduled for 2020) – though the English are not so sure.

Figures from a recent Survation poll, which included people from across Britain, show that a third of Scots think their country will be independent by the end of this parliament. Though this gives unionists cause for optimism the English seems to view divorce as more likely, with 43 percent predicting Scotland will break away within the next five years.

“It’s interesting that Scotland is split pretty much down the middle on whether independence will happen, even within a decade, while more people in England think it’s already lost,” says Sunder Katwala, director of the think-tank British Future, which commissioned the online survey of 4,000.

Long-term pessimism of the fate of the United Kingdom, which has existed for more than 300 years, is more rife than the short-term kind. Almost three-quarters of both English and Scots predict that this may be the last united British generation, with both groups expecting dissolution of the Union within 25 years.

“That’s a long-term challenge for unionism and an opportunity for Nicola Sturgeon to play the long game,” Katwala added. “Up to a third of that 72% will be ‘No’ voters who are resigned to independence, and her task will be to convince them that it’s all going to be alright.”

Header image – Edinburgh Castle by Stuart Caie