The wisdom of Edward Snowden: secret courts, American individualism, and uni censorship

Edward Snowden, January 2014 by DonkeyHotey

Since opening a Twitter account and mocking the NSA, the whistleblower Edward Snowden has been tweeting out his thoughts on a regular basis, much to the delight of his supporters.

In a series of messages yesterday he began by criticising a recent case in Iran in which Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian was convicted in a secret court.

He went on to advise, against the American instinct of individualism, for his followers to work together to protect civil liberties.

On the Black Lives Matter movement he noted that the marginalised are the “first” but not the “only” ones to be targeted in any campaigns of repression.

He also worried that the Internet might lead to increasingly militarisation of society (though historians will note that the public Internet itself came out of an American military project).

He then warned that social media is a weapon that the authorities can use against citizens:

Unsurprisingly Snowden had a lot of thoughts about how to respond to state surveillance against campaigners, a decades-old problem in the United States.

And in one of his final messages he seemed to respond to the numerous allegations of censorship on universities campuses, recent incidents having flared up in both Warwick and Manchester in Britain.

Image Credit – Edward Snowden, January 2014 by DonkeyHotey

Jimmy Nicholls

Jimmy Nicholls

Writer on Westminster, free speech, religion and so forth. Contact jimmy.nicholls@rightdishonourable.com

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