Podcast Ep. 100: Century Pootacular

Trump poo

Our contrasting reviews of Nick Clegg’s anti-Brexit book, Kipper Nigel Farage’s ambiguous call for a second referendum, and Donald Trump’s ‘shithole’ outrage are the three topics this week.

Joining us is a round number which we nod at before moving on.

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Clegg’s Knighthood Must Be for Services to Brexit

Nick Clegg Stop Brexit review 2

When Nick Clegg takes a knee in front of the Queen to receive his knighthood later this year, it will not be obvious what he has achieved in two decades of public office.

To be sure, as leader of the Liberal Democrats he was the first yellow tie in government since the Second World War. But his Commons seat loss at the hands of Corbynite Jared O’Mara – later disgraced for Internet rudeness – capped a year of Liberal destruction, in an election that has all but ensured Brexit by securing Jeremy Corbyn as Labour leader.

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Podcast Ep. 99: Brextremoaners Call Festive Truce

In our final episode of the year we look back at our highlights and lowlights, including the state of Brexit, the general election, Theresa May, Jeremy Corbyn, Nick Clegg, centrist parties and the Google memo.

Joining us is our rapidly dwindling 20s.

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Without consent there is no honourable case for remaining in the EU

March for Europe, July 2016 by mazz_5

A year ago I predicted that Britain was almost certain to trigger Article 50 and begin exiting the EU, after a narrow but clear victory for “leave” in the referendum.

So it has proved. In March prime minister Theresa May sent a letter to Brussels indicating that Britain will leave the bloc after 40 years’ membership. Legal commentary saw it as inevitable that once the article was invoked Britain would make for the exit, albeit with some resistance.

Now, who knows?

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Why the Liberal Democrats were really demolished at the general election

Nick Clegg preparing for Leaders Debate, April 2015 by Liberal Democrats

The pasting of Nick Clegg’s Liberal Democrats back in the May general election, reducing the party from 56 seats to eight in the Commons, was both widely predicted and widely underestimated.

Since the vote many put down the destruction of the party to contamination from their Conservative coalition partners, with the party themselves complaining that they were often blamed for the bad decisions in government and snubbed for the good ones.

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